Magical Moment: Disney Welcomes New Baby Elephant to Animal Kingdom Park

Corra, who was born in December, is the first African elephant calf to be born at Disney’s Animal Kingdom in seven years

<p>Olga Thompson/Disney</p> Corra the baby African elephant makes her public debut at Walt Disney World

Olga Thompson/Disney Corra the baby African elephant makes her public debut at Walt Disney World’s Animal Kingdom with help from her mom, Nadirah

Meet Corra!

On Thursday, the newest member of Walt Disney World’s Animal Kingdom — a baby elephant named Corra, born on Dec. 13 — made her public debut.

As Animal Kingdom in Lake Buena Vista, Florida, opened, the growing calf stopped for a brief photo op before entering the savanna for the first time, where visitors can see her on the Kilimanjaro Safaris ride.

Corra has gained nearly 100 lbs. since her birth, now weighing in at 312 lbs., and is starting to gain height on her parents, mom Nadirah and dad Mac, who reside at Animal Kingdom as well. Corra’s herd includes her mother, plus her aunts Stella and Luna, and her grandmother, Donna.

Nadirah was also born at Animal Kingdom, making Corra “the first second-generation elephant in Animal Kingdom’s history,” according to a blog post from Disney.

<p>Olga Thompson/Disney</p> Corra, the youngest African elephant at Walt Disney World's Animal Kingdom
Olga Thompson/Disney Corra, the youngest African elephant at Walt Disney World’s Animal Kingdom

Her birth was notable for other reasons: she was Nadirah’s first calf and the first African elephant calf to be born at Disney’s Animal Kingdom in seven years.

<p>Olga Thompson/Disney</p> Corra the baby African elephant with her mom Nadirah at Walt Disney World's Animal Kingdom

Olga Thompson/Disney Corra the baby African elephant with her mom Nadirah at Walt Disney World’s Animal Kingdom

Nadirah’s pregnancy lasted 22 months — a typical elephant gestational period — and according to a blog post from Disney, the new mom “voluntarily participated in her own care.” She also bonded with her baby following birth, with her sister Luna by her side.

According to Disney, it’s “common for adult females in the herd to assist in raising young elephants until they are considered to be independent, typically around 8 years old.” Therefore, Corra will likely roam the savanna with her relatives for several years to come.

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